Gospel and Vocation

Like any other doctrine, vocation must be brought into dialogue with the gospel to grasp its depths and beauty. I have chosen only a few conversation points between them. I want to look at vocation through a Trinitarian lens, gospel shaped vocation, and gospel need in vocation.

The Vocation of the Triune God


When we speak of God we speak of a Triune Being. God the Father, Son, and Spirit—one God in three distinct persons. Vocation is an idea rooted in the Trinity. God takes upon himself various roles in his engagement with the world. These roles fall underneath the categories of creation and salvation. The biblical narrative is clear that the Triune God engages his tasks with the utmost zeal, precision, and efficacy. A brief look at each of the three persons in action will shed light on the vocational God.
The Father
God the Father is the architect of creation. He is attributed with the design and execution of all that has been made. In the first few chapters of Genesis we observe a God who creates with skill, power, creativity, and joy.  In salvation, the Father continues in his role as the designer. To him belongs the plan of salvation. He plans, promises, elects, and sends the Son and Spirit in this work. In each of these areas he is filled with grace and intentionality. His work of salvation is as perfect as his work of creation.
The Spirit
The Spirit plays a vital role in creation. He hovers over the unformed world and breathes life into it. He gives and sustains life. He is the life source for all created beings. In the work of salvation he continues to be the life-giver. He empowers the sent Son to accomplish his saving task. He then is sent by the Son and Father to breathe regenerative life into those trusting the gospel. He sustains new life in people and conforms them into the image of the Son. The Holy Spirit is a mighty laborer who fulfills his tasks with passion and care. 
The Son
The Son is the “word” of God in creation. He is the means through which all things are created. He is God’s mediator. He is also the mediator of salvation. He is sent by the Father to bring his salvation plan to fruition. The Son is said to be the clearest revelation of God. He vividly reveals the vocational God. As the God-man, he also reveals how humans are to engage vocation. In other words, Jesus is the cardinal figure for understanding divine and human vocation.
The short statements about his childhood reveal something of the vocation of children. They are called to obey and honor their parents. They are called to schooling and learning. They are called to serve God above all else. In his later years, we learn that he followed in the footsteps of Joseph and worked as a carpenter. I imagine he engaged his task the same way he worked with his Father in fashioning the earth. The divine work ethic revealed in creation was surely manifest in Christ. It definitely was in his ministry.
In his ministry Jesus took on many roles. He was a teacher, preacher, healer, miracle worker, friend, and ultimately a Savior. His greatest work occurred at a cross and a tomb outside of Jerusalem. God punched the clock before he carried the cross to Golgotha. He was still on the clock when he strolled out of the grave and defeated death. Oswald Bayer hits it on the head when he connects divine vocation to creation and cross. 
“The common rule is: ‘God gives you office that you may serve.’ God’s action is determined by his self-proffering love, which seeks the lost and the fallen. For to Luther God himself, when he is described as Creator, becomes utterly like a human being faithful to his vocation, who gives himself to the lowly. God creates out of nothing, i.e. gives heed to the helpless who are at the point of death. In the crucifixion of Christ on Golgotha, he who was despised by the world showed himself a true Creator, one who makes his costliest work out of that which is nothing.”
The upshot of this is that divine vocation comes to a head in the gospel. In the gospel we see the most vivid demonstration of God fulfilling his role as Creator and Savior. Therefore the gospel is the richest resource for understanding vocation.
The Gospel Shape of Vocation


The gospel is the blueprint for our vocational endeavors. In it we learn these valuable lessons that should translate into our various stations in life.Vocational identity shifts throughout the seasons of our lives
  • Vocation is earthly, normal, and gloriously mundane
  • Vocation is the means by which we love and serve others
  • Vocation is to be engaged with whole hearted excellence
  • Vocation requires suffering, sacrifice, and pain
Vocation Drives us to the Gospel


The gospel shapes vocation, but it also supports us as we engage vocation. As we noted in the last post, our stations in life have a way of exposing our sinful tendencies. We also recognize that though we try our best to execute our vocations with integrity, faithfulness, and selflessness, we fall short of that quite often. We recognize that the gospel example is impossible to follow with our own resources. This is where God uses the gospel standard to drive us back to the gospel promise.
Gospel shaped vocation requires continual gospel support. God’s grace is woven through every facet of vocation. In his vocational activity he rescues us and provides the pattern for our callings. He then undergirds us in our endeavors by gospel strength and cleansing.
 
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