Weakness and the Divine Resume

Resumes are a catalogue of our strengths. We put our best foot forward. Weakness is nowhere to be found on one of these. God’s resume looks very different…when we look at how he works, weakness is not avoided—it is chosen.

Weakness is his prevalent mode of operation, it is his strategy. One author says, “The biblical storyline is one not of God being frustrated by human weakness but attracted to it.” The three greatest characters in the Old Testament are point in fact.

Promises through Idolater Abraham and Infertile Sarah

  • Abraham was a moon worshipper (Josh 24:2) and his wife Sarah was barren. God chose this couple to create a nation that would bless the world. His choice had weakness front and center. Deuteronomy 7:7 calls God’s choice of this great people a choice of  “the fewest of Peoples.”

Deliverance through Insecure Moses

  • The Israelites were enslaved for 400 years and they cried to God for help. He chose the most unlikely deliverer. Moses himself knew he was weak. Twice he says to God, “If the Israelites will not listen to me, why would Pharaoh listen to me, since I speak with faltering lips?” Yet, God persists. He did not make a mistake in the choice of Moses, he is not surprised by his weaknesses. God used Moses to accomplish the decisive Old Testament rescue of God’s people, which became the very template for all God’s saving action.

Kingship through Shepherd Boy David

  • The choice of the greatest King of Israel was not unlike the choice of Moses. Samuel the prophet was told that he would come from the family of a man named Jesse. He went to his home to find the King. Jesse brought seven of his sons before him, when Samuel saw the tallest and strongest he thought, “this must be the one.” God responded with a reminder that he does not look on the outward appearance but inward to the heart. After they had all paraded through, Samuel knew that none of them were the chosen King. “Are these all your sons?” Jesse told him there was one more, the youngest who is out taking care of the sheep. Sure enough, the unexpected, unnoticed, smallest, youngest—this was God’s King.

Hebrews 11 and the Hall of Weakness

  • Hebrews 11 has often been called the hall of faith, it may be more fitting to call it the hall of weakness. Abraham, Moses and David dominate this chapter of the Bible and their stories highlight their great weakness as much as their great faith. If you read this chapter, most characters in  the great hall are explicitly described as weak in the Old Testament. In fact, in one of the summary statements these people of faith were said to be made strong out of weakness” (Hebrews 11:34).

I love Scripture’s real portrayal of human beings—all the biblical models of faith are normal, broken people. Like us they all struggled to believe and be faithful. I find this greatly comforting.

Weakness is God’s design. It is his strategy. As Paul says, “God chose what is foolish in the world to shame the wise; God chose what is weak in the world to shame the strong.” (1 Cor 1:27). Weakness is God’s choice, not strength. Hudson Taylor was right, “All God’s giants have been weak people.”