kindness

Why Weakness Should Drive us Godward

Weakness, moral and otherwise has a way of pushing us away from God. It certainly does not serve as a confidence builder when approaching the holy God of the universe.

Hebrews introduces us to a different perspective, an incarnational logic. Take a look at Hebrews 4:14-16.

“Since then we have a great high priest who has passed through the heavens, Jesus, the Son of God, let us hold fast our confession. For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin. Let us then with confidence draw near to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need.”

The call in this passage is to “hold fast our confession” and to “draw near” to God with confidence that we might know the help of grace when in need. Note what grounds  the call, what forms the foundation of this confidence.

Incredibly, it’s how God engages our weakness. The “for” and “then” of the text drive us to the central confidence giver in the face of weakness—a sympathetic Savior.

We do not have a mediator who lacks understanding, a stand-between ignorant of suffering, a high priest incapable of meeting weakness with grace. He is sympathetic (συμπαθῆσαι). This is a description of the God-man. This is the fruit of  the incarnation and cross—understanding and sympathy.

The NIGTC commentary on Hebrews states that “Christ’s earthly life gives him inner understanding of human experience, and thus makes him ready and able to give active help.”

The very thing that drives us away from God should push us toward him. Our weakness is always met by a gracious, understanding Savior who desires to provide help. He does not engage our weakness with condemnation, but kindness.

Through Christ even our weaknesses are transformed into an invitation to know his grace and mercy. They are the occasion for experiencing God’s help.

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The Considerate God

Working through the gospel of Mark I have been consistently moved by the way Jesus interacts with people. As the God-man he perfectly manifests true humanity and true deity. In Jesus we behold God. “He is the radiance of the glory of God and the exact imprint of his nature” (Heb 1:3). “In him all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell” (Col 1:19).

God is thoroughly considerate in his engagement with humanity. He listens to people, shares a meal with anyone, touches people with frightening diseases, generously gives his time, heals the blind, the paralyzed and the sick, cares about people’s pain and questions, and grieves over the suffering of others.

On two occasions Jesus feeds thousands of hungry people by miraculously multiplying loaves and fish. He cares for the physical needs of people. On one occasion Jesus miraculously raises a twelve year old child from the dead. The surrounding story of this miracle reveals a deeply considerate God (Mk 5:21-43).

In the narrative Jesus listens with concern to the fear and desperation of the parents. He responds to their heartfelt requests with care and action. He speaks words of comfort to them. He speaks life into the lifeless child. Everyone is astonished and overwhelmed.

I was struck by the dialogue that follows the miracle. “He gave strict orders not to let anyone know about this, and told them to give her something to eat” (Mk 5:43). Sustenance was the furthest thing from anyone’s mind, they had just observed a lifeless girl sit up! But it was on the mind of God. Jesus gave her life back and then made sure she had something to eat. I love this picture of God, so considerate, so kind, so practical.