The Father’s Humility at the Cross

The cross is the pinnacle of humility (Phil 2:5-11). We know that event displays the heart and character of Christ, but what about the Father? Is there humility displayed in his role in Calvary? I believe so.

The Father’s Humility at the Cross

When we discuss the Trinity and the cross we must tread lightly. All too often the three persons are polarized and misrepresented. Caricatures of a stern distant father and an unwilling Son abound. The truth, the Triune God suffers at the cross. All three persons experience suffering. All three persons demonstrate sacrifice and humility.

Jurgen Moltmann captures the unique suffering and humility of the Father in the cross of his Son.

“The Son suffers dying, the Father suffers the death of his Son. The grief of the Father here is just as important as the death of the Son. The Fatherlessness of the Son is matched by the Sonlessness of the Father, and if God has constituted himself as the Father of Jesus Christ, then he also suffers the death of his Fatherhood in the death of the Son.”

A rarely explored dimension of the cross, this perspective opens a window into the humility of God the Father. In the giving of his beloved Son the Father is saying, “I am meek and humble in heart.” Humility is outward looking self-sacrificial love. If the Father’s gift of Christ is not an expression of humility, I don’t know what is.

I will end this post with a great quote by Jurgen Schulz. I believe he is correct in his assessment of the centrality of the cross in displaying the heart of God. Though he doesn’t use the language of humility he is touching the concept.

“The Triune God who lives in the Eternal Dance of glory, goodness and grace. The God of Calvary love. The God Christ came to reveal.There is one way of knowing what He is really like—look at Jesus. Look at the cross. Only the Son knows the Father, and those to whom the Son makes Him known.He is a God who lays down his life for others. That is what actually goes on inside the Trinity! Self-sacrificing love. One author described Him as a Supreme Being of ‘fathomless unselfishness.’ The cross was not an accident. It is what this Triune Community is all about. It is what the Bible means when it says, “God is love.” What an amazing Deity He turns out to be!”

The Father’s Humility In Eternity Past

In the previous post we began a series on the humility of God the Father. We spent time establishing that Father, Son, and Spirit are perfectly equal in essence and character. Humility therefore marks the Father as much as it does the Son and Spirit. We turn our attention in this post to the Triune relationship before the world was created.

The Father’s Humility before Creation

The interaction of the Trinity pre-exists creation and has always been characterized by humility. John gives us a glimpse of this…”And now, Father, glorify me in your own presence with the glory that I had with you before the world existed” (John 17:5). This is a unique window into Trinitarian interaction.

The sharing of glory and honor predates the world. The Father has always been passionate about exalting his Son. The way the Father interacts with the Son in his incarnate state is reflective of how he has always treated him. In theological terms the economic Trinity cannot be separated from the immanent Trinity.

When Scripture says that God is jealous for his glory we must remember that we are talking about a Triune God (Is 48:9-11). Diving glory happens in community. The Father, Son, and Spirit are equally passionate about extolling one another. God is indeed passionate for his glory. The Father is adamant that the Son be lifted high. The Son is deeply concerned that the Father be honored. The Spirit refuses to shine the light on himself, he wants Christ to be seen.

When viewed through this lens God’s glory becomes a brilliant display of humility. Glory happens precisely when one selflessly lifts another. In the divine economy I would go as far as saying that God’s glory is his humility. Tim Keller helps further capture this outward looking posture of the Trinity.

“Each of the divine persons centers upon the others. None demands that the others revolve around him. Each voluntarily circles the other two, pouring love, delight, and adoration into them. Each person of the Trinity loves, adores, defers to, and rejoices in the others. That creates a dynamic, pulsating dance of joy and love.”